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  • Psychology

    Woodbury University

    Explore the mind

  • Psychology

    Woodbury University

    Explore the mind

  • Psychology

    Woodbury University

    Explore the mind

Explore Psychology

Psychology at Woodbury

Bachelor of Arts Psychology

Woodbury’s psychology major examines the complexities of human behavior as individuals, members of groups and as part of the larger social community. Through research, analysis and scientific study, our program dissects the roles of humans as consumers and communicators. This program is writing-intensive with an emphasis on critical thinking. Our faculty encourages students to apply their classroom knowledge to real-world issues and experiences.

THE MISSION

The psychology program’s mission is to develop empathic, critical thinkers who can apply their study of human behavior to creative problem solving.

THE PILLARS

Our program is built upon these four pillars:

Transdisciplinarity: Thinking and acting holistically by bridging multiple perspectives and practices.

Design Thinking: Creating impactful solutions by linking needs and functions to limits and possibilities.

Entrepreneurship: Pursuing visionary opportunities to realize innovative knowledge, practice or product.

Civic Engagement: Strengthening communities by actively applying critical knowledge, skills and values.

Graduates of the psychology department have the advantage of flexibility in pursuing multiple career paths. Psychology majors are prepared to work in diverse fields such as psychology, counseling, human behavior, social services and media communications. Students receive a strong foundation in psychological theory and application that successfully prepares them to continue their education at the graduate school level.

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Are you ready to begin your psychology studies?

Students emerge from Woodbury’s psychology program with the knowledge, tools, and networking skills necessary to build a successful career. Woodbury’s internship model combines theory with practice by offering hands-on experience working with large corporations, small businesses or non-profits. Through these internships, Woodbury students gain valuable workplace experience that build marketable skills prior to graduation.

If you are interested in applying to WU, click the Apply button on this page. Questions? Click Live Chat or the Info button. Prefer to speak to someone? Just give us a call. Enter your contact information to get on our emailing list.

Chair:

Joye Swan
Phone: 818-252-5151
Email: joye.swan@woodbury.edu

CONTACT US

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Psychology FACULTY

Woodbury University takes pride in its accomplished faculty and intimate, family-like atmosphere. In addition to teaching, our faculty continue to work as professionals in their fields, passing along the latest technology, trends, and strategies in the current market to WU students. We foster close mentoring relationships between faculty and student. Through this individual attention, we are able to know you as a person, and how we can best help you find your path to success.

Program Schedule and Curriculum

The Psychology curriculum is designed to prepare graduates through a solid understanding and mastery of the fundamentals of psychological science. It provides students with a thorough foundation in theory, research design, statistics and critical thinking, along with an emphasis on applying psychological principles to real world issues.

The Department of Psychology offers students in other majors the opportunity to complete a minor in psychology. A communication minor is recommended for psychology majors.

Theoretical Core
PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology
This course introduces students to the basic concepts of psychology and the psychological processes of perception, learning, thinking, motivation, personality, development, and social behavior. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I.

PSYC 210 Developmental Psychology
This course focuses on the study of the psychological development of the person from the prenatal period through old age and death. The course emphasizes theories and their applications to the understanding of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional changes that occur throughout the human life span. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture, or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 305 Personality
This course focuses on the study of historical development of major personality theories, including psychoanalytic, humanistic and learning approaches. Methods of personality measurement, such as objective and projective tests, inventories and other assessment procedures will also be explored. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 309 Abnormal Psychology
Abnormal psychology is the study of disorders of a psychological nature. This course is intended to familiarize the student with the symptoms, causes and treatments of a variety of such disorders, including mood, anxiety, and personality disorders as well as disorders related to substance abuse. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 320 Sensation and Perception
This course focuses on understanding how individuals obtain information from the environment and various theories as to how that information is processed. Topics will include basic sensory physiology, psychophysics, visual perception, auditory perception, tactile perception, and the chemical senses. 3 units. Prerequisites: MATH 049 Elementary Algebra; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology.
Applied Core
PSYC 300 Social Psychology
Social psychology is concerned with the interaction of individuals with other individuals and groups. Topics include attitudes, prejudice, persuasion, obedience and attraction. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture, or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; COMM 120 Public Speaking; and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology. Majors must pass PSYC 300 with a grade of “C” or higher.

PSYC 306 Influence and Persuasion
This course explores on how people influence themselves and each other singly and in groups. The activities of compliance professionals such as salespersons, con artists, politicians, etc. are stressed. Additionally, concentration is placed on research into the effects of influence and the ethics of the application of influence. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 490 Internship
Students obtain practical, on-the-job training in a setting of business, law, government agency, or other organization. Work experience is complemented by an academic requirement and periodic meetings with the student’s on-campus internship advisor. Students are required to complete ninety hours at the internship site, with an additional thirty hours devoted to weekly written summaries as well as a final written review of the experience. 3 units. Prerequisite: Junior standing, Psychology majors only.
Research Design
PSYC 221 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences
This course emphasizes a conceptual rather than computational understanding of basic statistical concepts, including descriptive and inferential statistics, probability and hypothesis testing. A key component of the course is the introduction to statistical computation using the SPSS computer program. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: Placement exam or MATH 149 Intermediate Algebra with a grade of “C” or better. Majors must pass with a grade of “C” or higher.

PSYC 230 Foundations of Research Methods
This course introduces students to the methods psychologists use to conduct research. Students will learn about the scientific method—the universal language of science—as well as how to form research questions and hypotheses, how to design and critique studies, how to analyze and interpret research data, and how to control variables. In particular, an important way in which students will learn about research methods in this course is through performing research studies rather than just reading about them. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing l; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; PSYC 221 Into Statistics for Behvrl Sciences; and a minimum of three upper division Psychology courses. Majors must pass the class with a grade of “C” or better.

PSYC 331 Advanced Applied Statistics
This course examines the application of advanced statistical methods including multivariate and nonparametric analyses. Course focuses on selecting appropriate statistical analyses and computer skills to perform the analyses using SPSS, and the interpretation of computer generated results. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: PSYC 221 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences. Must pass with a grade of “C” or higher.

PSYC 402 Advanced Research Methods
This course examines advanced experimental and research methodology in contemporary psychology. Specific topics from areas of student interest are applied to hypothesis formation, experimental design, observation, measurement and data collection. Individuals will be expected to complete a scientific research study from conception to implementation to statistical analysis to written APA-style manuscript. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; PSYC 221 Intro Statistics for Behvrl Sciences, and have completed a minimum of six upper division Psychology courses. Students must pass PSYC 402 Adv Research Methods with a grade of “C” or higher. Senior Standing, Psychology majors only.

PSYC 410 Senior Thesis
The course emphasizes the student’s ability to synthesize and integrate the knowledge gained throughout the program. Students will be expected to possess an appropriate range of expertise regarding the field and science of psychology and to translate this knowledge into impacting the knowledge base of understanding of human behavior in real world settings. This is accomplished through a capstone written research project honed from the Advanced Research Methods course. Students will work independently with their Senior Thesis faculty member. 3 units. Prerequisite: Senior standing, Psychology majors only.
Cultural Emphasis
PSYC 301 Group Processes
This course focuses on the study of intergroup processes and structure, including cooperation, hostility and prejudice, stereotypes, influence, and conformity. The class will examine leadership and membership issues in such settings as families, study group and team projects. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture, or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 314 Psychology of Gender
This course focuses on the examination of the concepts and issues related to gender viewed from a broad range of disciplines within the social sciences with an emphasis on historical antecedents, evolution, biology, and cultural norms. Issues include the meaning of gender in society, the development of gender identity, sex roles, and gender differences in aptitudes and abilities. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 315 Industrial/Organizational Psychology
This course explores the study of human organizations in the workplace. Topics include cultural issues involved in the development of industry and the structure of these organizations, the efficacy of various organizational structures on productivity and well-being of the employees, organizational structure as a reflection of values and norms, and the effect of changes in a culture on organizational behavior and vice versa. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II and WRIT 21, Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.

PSYC 316 Cross-Cultural Psychology
This course looks at the search for commonalities and differences in behavior, attitudes and norms across cultures. The focus is on the applicability of western theories of human psychology to other cultures, broadly defined to include nationality, race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 120 Public Speaking.
Media Emphasis
PSYC 317 Media Psychology
This course encompasses the behavioral aspects of media in activities, events, theories, and practices regarding the effects and behaviors stimulated by media elements. These include pictures, sound, graphics, and content and their effects on the senses and intelligences. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; COMM 120 Public Speaking and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology.

PSYC 318 Consumer Behavior
This course examines the application of psychological theory and applied research methods to the study of consumer behavior. The psychological processes that influence consumer decision making will be addressed including product recognition, alternative evaluation and choice behavior, and post-purchase attitudes and behavior. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architecture and Interior Architecture or LSCI 205 Information Sources in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; COMM 120 Public Speaking and PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology.

STUDENT WORDS ON WOODBURY

  • "My experience at Woodbury has been incredibly fulfilling and nothing like what I thought the "college experience" would be like. I have been prepared for my career in my graphic design courses while growing as a leader through my roles in student government and residential life. The unforgettable memories and experiences I have had have shaped me to grow as a human being in ways I couldn't imagine.

    Gilberto Ruiz-Ortega