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  • Communication

    Woodbury University

    Create your path

  • Communication

    Woodbury University

    Create your path

  • Communication

    Woodbury University

    Create your path

Explore Communication

Communication at Woodbury

Communication is the study of meaning and the way its symbolic representations reflect and shape cultural practices.  Our department encourages students to understand these communication processes through creative thinking, academic research, and ethical reflection.  The curriculum integrates theoretical expertise with practical skills in communication and media production.  Students in our program graduate with the knowledge needed to succeed in a wide variety of fields related to media, communications, and cultural studies.

The Department of Communication at Woodbury fosters critical thought, creative inquiry, rhetorical ability, media literacy, collaborative spirit, and individual perspective. The program is built upon these four pillars:

Transdisciplinarity: Thinking and acting holistically by bridging multiple perspectives and practices

Design Thinking: Creating impactful solutions by linking needs and functions to limits and possibilities

Entrepreneurship: Pursuing visionary opportunities to realize innovative knowledge, practice or product

Civic Engagement: Strengthening communities by actively applying critical knowledge, skills and values

Communication graduates are prepared to enter a diverse array of fields within the media and entertainment industries, as well as advertising, social media marketing, and public relations.  The degree also readies students wishing to further their studies in graduate programs related to communications, media, journalism, and the law.

Students Showcase Their Work

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Practical experience is one of the key components of a Woodbury University education.

Are you ready to begin your communication career?

Students emerge from Woodbury’s Communication program with the knowledge, tools, and networking skills necessary to build a successful career. Woodbury’s internship model combines theory with practice by offering hands-on experience working with large corporations, small businesses, and nonprofits.  Through these internships, Woodbury students gain valuable workplace experience that builds marketable skills prior to graduation.

Communication students have successfully completed internships at:

  •  The Walt Disney Company
  • Warner Bros.
  • The Tonight Show with Jay Leno
  • Tom Ford International
  • Pacific Ballet Dance Theatre
  • Miles High Productions
  • KTLA

If you are interested in applying to WU, click the Apply button on this page. Questions? Click Live Chat or the Info button. Prefer to speak to someone? Just give us a call. To get on our emailing list, enter your contact information.

Chair:

Nicole Keating
Phone: 818-394-3340
Email: nicole.keating@woodbury.edu

Administrative Assistant:

Stephanie Tito
Phone: 818-252-5215
Email: stephanie.tito@woodbury.edu

CONTACT US

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Communication FACULTY

Woodbury University takes pride in its accomplished faculty and intimate, family-like atmosphere. In addition to teaching, our faculty continue to work as professionals in their fields, passing along the latest technology, trends, and strategies in the current market to WU students. We foster close mentoring relationships between faculty and student. Through this individual attention, we are able to know you as a person, and best help you find your path to success.

Curriculum

Our curriculum spans the full range of communication studies including broadcasting, media analysis, and popular culture. Students in the major have the opportunity to develop a self-designed education plan that includes additional cross-disciplinary coursework from other areas of the school including animation, graphic design, fashion design, and psychology.

The major culminates in a four-year Bachelor of Arts degree.

PUBLIC COMMUNICATION
COMM 110 Creative Writing
This course introduces students to fiction writing with an emphasis on the short story that provides a foundation for writing across all disciplines. Self-expression and experimentation will be encouraged within the framework of the narrative tradition. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 204 Public Relations
This course introduces messaging strategy using a combination of public relations theory and practical application. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 209 Advertising
This course introduces students to North American advertising techniques. Components of advertising campaigns are used to illustrate these techniques in both successful and unsuccessful marketing efforts. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I.

COMM 314 Contemporary Journalism
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of newspaper, magazine, and web journalism, including the writing of hard news stories, features, profiles, and entertainment reviews. Students will collaborate in the writing, editing and publishing of the online student newspaper. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212, Rhetoric and Design and LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines. No lab costs.
SPEECH COMMUNICATION
COMM 120 Public Speaking
This course provides a study of the oral presentation of ideas and feelings that blend contemporary communication theory with traditional approaches to public address. This course also provides experience in public speaking, interpersonal communication, and critical listening. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: None. Offered spring, summer, and fall. No lab costs.

COMM 210 Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal communication is the most widespread form of human communication. This course fosters a dialogic view of interpersonal exchange, in which meaning is co-created. Throughout the semester, the course provides opportunities for students to improve interpersonal communication in their personal and professional lives. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 231 Oral Interpretation
This course develops communication skills by focusing almost entirely on those aspects of presentation associated with voice, body, and gesture. A unique performative approach combines the discovery of meaning in written texts with the effective communication of that meaning to an audience. A variety of traditional and non-traditional literary forms will be used including prose, poetry, drama, autobiography, letters, and oral history. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 307 Rhetorical Theory
This course surveys major classical and neoclassical treatises on rhetoric. The works include those of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, St. Augustine, Blair, Burke, Whately, Toulmin, Campbell, Habermas, and other leading theoreticians. New units might look at African, Asian, and feminist approaches to rhetoric. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 203 Communication Theory. No lab costs.

COMM 310 Argumentation and Debate
Examines the uses of argument, evidence, and the various types of proof. Attention is given to the different formal debate structures and modes of refutation. Treats reasoning and explores logical fallacies. Students participate in classroom debates on significant contemporary issues. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; and COMM 120 Public Speaking. No lab costs.
CULTURAL STUDIES
COMM 212 Intercultural Communication
This course provides an inter-, intra-, and cross-cultural analysis of processes and problems of communication as affected by ethnic or national identity; effects of differences in language, values, meaning, perception, and thought are examined. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

Comm 323: Cultural Studies
Cultural Studies is an academic discipline devoted to understanding and “reading” the world around us, particularly those elements we define as “culture.” In this class, we will examine some of the different theories and theorists that make up the field of Cultural Studies, as well as various methods used to decode the objects and ideas that surround us. We will explore how culture acts on individuals in society, how it is produced, where it is located, and how it engenders consensus. We will pay particular attention to how culture relates to power, whether that power is tied to producers or consumers, the industry or the academy, the ruling class or the subculture. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design. No lab costs.

COMM 327 Communication and the Sexes
This course provides an exploration of how cultural values and habits influence view on femininity and masculinity, how expectations of gender are communicated, and how communication affirms or challenges prevailing cultural prescriptions of gender in intra- and interpersonal, small group, public, and organizational settings. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II. No lab costs.

COMM 450 Collaborative Seminar
These advanced special topics seminars seek to address the changing nature of communication processes in relation to a single grand theme. Previous offerings included themes related to the future, the global context, and the virtual world. Thematic Seminar may be taken twice for credit in the major. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 307 Rhetorical Theory. No lab costs.
THEORY/RESEARCH
COMM 203 Communication Theory
This course introduces and critically analyzes the major theories of communication with an emphasis on media. The course also provides review of the characteristics of the message, the communicator and the audience that affect the impact of the message. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 230 Research Methods
This course introduces students to qualitative research methods. Students will work on the formulation of research problems, establish field relations and tactics, develop interviewing skills, perform ethnography, and write research reports. The difference between quantitative and qualitative research will also be explored. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 400: Philosophy of Communication
This course introduces students to some of the philosophical issues involved in human communication. Topics will include: the analysis of different types of communication (interpersonal, electronic, mass, etc.); the relationship between communication and identity; the connection between communication and politics; the nature of language; and the role that symbols play in communication. These topics will guide discussions that investigate the role of communication in larger philosophical issues, such as existential notions of being and the production and dissemination of knowledge. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; COMM 100 Media Culture or COMM 120 Public Speaking. No lab costs.

COMM 460 Critical Studies in Communication
In this writing-intensive course, students gain a thorough understanding of the critical studies approach in communication. Students examine media texts and other forms of communicating through the lens of current critical and cultural theory. To do so, extensive use is made of the collection of important journal articles housed in the media research room of the library. Successful completion of the course satisfies the departmental requirement for a comprehensive exam. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing II; COMM 307 Rhetorical Theory and COMM 312 Communication and Culture. No lab costs.

COMM 485: Senior Seminar
This class is a capstone for students in the communication major. Students will engage in extensive research and produce a major research paper or original project appropriate to the field of communication. The creation of personal learning portfolios will help identify pertinent themes and research topics for each student.

COMM 490: Communication Internship
Students participate in an on-the-job practicum in commercial settings in media design, entertainment, and marketing firms. Work experience is complemented by academic requirements specified in a contract with the faculty advisor.
MEDIA STUDIES
COMM 100 Media Culture
With the wide array of media technologies, modes, and formats that intersect nearly all aspects of our daily lives – from cinema to television to radio, from computers to cell phones to tablets – it is essential in this day and age that we think critically about the media. This course will examine the relationship between media, their institutions, and the world we live in. We will look at how different forms of media work, focusing on how they affect perception and structure meaning. Our goal in this class will be to develop the critical tools necessary for analyzing and interpreting media as we explore the complex relationship between media formats, institutions, policy and society. Lecture. 3 units. Corequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 200 Screening Series
This course exposes students to a variety of media screenings: contemporary, classic, experimental, documentary, and more. The course is designed to be a combination of screenings and special events, so during some weekly meetings the students will benefit from guest speakers, workshops, or performances. Lecture. 1.5 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing 1. Corequisites: COMM 215 Media History or COMM 212 Intercultural Communication.

COMM 215 Media History
How do new forms of media and communication grow out of older forms? How do new media technologies alter the cultures from which they emerge? This course explores how major developments in media technologies have influenced history and how significant historical and social changes have reshaped media forms. In so doing, the course draws connections between the present and historically and culturally specific modes of communication. Through course readings, lively discussions, library research, and media screenings, student will engage with this "living history" and gain insight into the social implications of the media technologies of today. Lecture 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I.

COMM 222 Film Studies
This course introduces students to the study of film form and culture. Films can be understood from a number of perspectives: as a technology, as a business, as entertainment, as art, and perhaps most importantly, as a socio-cultural artifact that reflects the cultural conditions under which they are produced and received. Towards that end, this class will explore a wide variety of issues related to the study of film, including aspects of production, distribution, reception, film form and style, genre, and authorship. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I.

COMM 225: Writing for Media
In this course, students develop writing skills specific to various media-related fields. Students work on projects in print and digital journalism, advertising, screenwriting, public relations and broadcasting. The emphasis is on writing structure and style, the importance of revising and editing, and the emergence of a writer’s voice. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I.

COMM 233 Video Production Workshop
This course is a hands-on television production course that provides solid grounding in the technical and creative aspects of production. Students will conceptualize and develop group video projects and become familiar with Final Cut Pro editing techniques. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. Lab costs: approx. $100.

COMM 235 Media Ethics
This course introduces the subject of media ethics through readings, lectures, discussions and case studies. This course is divided into two parts. Part One deals with the foundations of ethics and various dimensions of media ethics, such as truthfulness, privacy, identity politics, violence and sexual pornography. Part Two then covers case studies in a number of media industries, including but not limited to journalism, entertainment, graphics, fashion, advertising, and public relations. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I.

COMM 250 The Director's Craft
Through lectures, discussions and analyses of screenings of films and film clips, this course will present a historical introduction to contemporary independent film and video making and offer a step-by-step guide to the art, craft and business of low-budget film and video making in the digital age. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: WRIT 111 Academic Writing I. No lab costs.

COMM 305 Media, Self & Society
This course provides an exploration of the techniques used in propaganda and the persuasive communication strategies that convert ideas into ideologies. These techniques and strategies are illustrated in several ways including marketing campaigns, artistic efforts, and wartime propaganda. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and COMM 100 Media Culture or COMM 203 Communication Theory. No lab costs.

COMM 320 Understanding TV
This course uses a cultural approach to examine television’s evolution both as a technological medium of communication and conversely as a reflection of society itself. Students will explore the storytelling and myth-making functions of television within the wider socio-cultural context. Students will also use a variety of theoretical perspectives, drawn from multiple areas of study, to understand the history, technology, and meaning of televisual discourse. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design and LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines. No lab costs.

COMM 323: Cultural Studies
Cultural Studies is an academic discipline devoted to understanding and “reading” the world around us, particularly those elements we define as “culture.” In this class, we will examine some of the different theories and theorists that make up the field of Cultural Studies, as well as various methods used to decode the objects and ideas that surround us. We will explore how culture acts on individuals in society, how it is produced, where it is located, and how it engenders consensus. We will pay particular attention to how culture relates to power, whether that power is tied to producers or consumers, the industry or the academy, the ruling class or the subculture.

COMM 327: Communication and the Sexes
This course provides an exploration of how cultural values and habits influence view on femininity and masculinity, how expectations of gender are communicated, and how communication affirms or challenges prevailing cultural prescriptions of gender in intra- and interpersonal, small group, public, and organizational settings.

COMM 330: Social Media
This course looks at the new channels of communication that make up the social media space. Students explore why the shift is happening now both locally and globally, placing ‘power’ in the hands of citizens and consumers. Students gain the latest information on communication, public relations, advertising and marketing strategies used across all industries. They will acquire practical skills through assignments and tasks involving social networks, content sharing, blogs, podcasts, wikis, and Twitter.

Comm 335: Media and Social Change
This course examines the relationship between media and social justice, first by exploring the theoretical/historical foundations of these connections, and then by putting theory into practice through media production projects.

COMM 341 Film Genres
This course examines film genres from the silent era to the present, focusing specifically on how genres have evolved over time. We will look at historical and literary antecedents, break down subjects, themes and characters, learn about principal filmmakers and, most importantly, gain a better understanding of the myths and ideologies that underlie genre filmmaking. The course will focus on a single genre as case study; potential topics include the western, the musical, the spy film, comedy, and the war film. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisite: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines; and WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design. No lab costs.

COMM 342 Film Noir
This course explores the origins and evolution of the film noir, from its literary beginnings to its contemporary manifestations. We will look at the loosening of censorship structures that allowed for noir’s emergence in Hollywood, the politics of post-war America that gave context to the films’ bleak cynicism, and the films’ distinctive style and character archetypes as we work to develop a better understanding of the mythology and ideology of this endlessly fascinating genre. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines and WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design. No lab costs.

COMM 350 World Cinema
This course offers a survey of narrative filmmaking outside of the United States from World War II through the beginning of the 21st century, focusing on various New Cinemas and other significant and influential film movements. The goal of the course is to examine the aesthetic histories of international filmmaking, while analyzing how particular film movements respond to local and global changes in political, social, and cultural climates over time. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects, or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines and WRIT 112 Academic Writing II or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design. No lab costs.

COMM 360 Media Professions
This course is intended for students in the third year of the program. It provides advanced communication students with a “window” into various fields related to communication and media studies, and gives students the chance to examine future career options. Through guest speakers, field trips, analysis of media industries and completion of student projects, students gain a better understanding of the career opportunities (and internship possibilities) available to them. Students also examine the cultural significance of the professions within contemporary society, and consider the role of “work” in personal identity. Students will write a research paper related to their chosen area of specialization. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: WRIT 112 Academic Writing 2 or WRIT 212 Rhetoric and Design; COMM 100 Media Culture or COMM 203 Communication Theory and LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 105 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects or LSCI 205 Information in the Disciplines.

COMM 370 Special Topics in Communication
This a seminar devoted to selected topics of special interest to students and faculty. Lecture. 3 units. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice or LSCI 106 Information Sources for Architects and Interior Architects or LSCI 205, Information in the Discipline; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II and COMM 100 Media Culture or COMM 203 Communication Theory. No lab costs.

COMM 3715 Media & Social Change
This course examines the relationship between media and social justice, first by exploring the theoretical/historical foundations of these connections, and then by putting theory into practice through media production projects. Prerequisites: LSCI 105 Information Theory and Practice; WRIT 112 Academic Writing II; COMM 233 Video Production Workshop or FILM 1700 Film Production.

COMM 485: Senior Seminar
This class is a capstone for students in the communication major. Students will engage in extensive research and produce a major research paper or original project appropriate to the field of communication. The creation of personal learning portfolios will help identify pertinent themes and research topics for each student.

COMM 490: Communication Internship
Students participate in an on-the-job practicum in commercial settings in media design, entertainment, and marketing firms. Work experience is complemented by academic requirements specified in a contract with the faculty advisor.

STUDENTS ON WOODBURY

  • "I really enjoy Woodbury's Communication program because it's like a small family within a larger family. We all know each other and can go to one another for help!"

    Ashley Hackworth

  • "I chose Woodbury University's Communication Department because it focuses on media and entertainment. Upon gaining knowledge and skills from these prospective fields, the department offered me opportunities to explore different careers within these industries."

    Jaime Villar

  • "The Communication Department helped me grow as a person and career wise. I love how professors genuinely care about our interests by incorporating them in lessons."

    Veronica Calabrese